TREATMENT OF THE INCARCERATED:

The Prison Litigation Reform Act shall be eliminated.

Persons who are incarcerated shall have access to earned benefits (e.g. retiree health insurance, veterans health care, veteran’s educational benefits, etc.) in cases where the department of corrections cannot or will not provide comparable services.

No one shall be subject to long-term restraints (greater than 4 hours) unless authorized and monitored by a medical doctor.

Individuals shall be provided timely and appropriate health care. No fees shall be charged for health care.

Persons entering the system shall be evaluated to determine their educational, psychological, and social needs. Every effort shall be made to address those needs while the individual is incarcerated.

No one shall be held for a lengthy period in a facility (e.g. jail) that provides very limited programs and services.

No person shall be held in isolation for a nonviolent infraction.

No person shall be held in isolation for a total of more than four hours for a violent infraction.

There shall be mechanisms to prevent overcrowding, since that contributes to inhumane treatment.

No one shall be shackled or restrained during labor or if it will interfere with the delivery of medical care.

Every effort shall be made to compensate for lack of education that may have contributed to a person’s criminal behavior. GED classes shall be standard and provided free by the state to all prisoners without a diploma or GED. Aptitude testing and vocational training shall be provided to ensure job readiness upon release.

Individuals who are incarcerated shall be able to access Pell grants and other similar aid programs to facilitate their pursuit of a college education.

Programs, policies, and tools shall ensure that individuals are able to maintain their social networks through fair and friendly telephone, surface mail, email, and visitation services, including private family visits. Restrictions shall be imposed only if needed to protect specific victim(s). Family members in the free world shall be able to visit any and all incarcerated family members. Subject to security screening, there shall be no limit to the number of persons on a visiting list or call list. At the very least, persons who are indigent shall be provided with postage and writing materials to facilitate contact by surface mail and at least one call per month to family or friends.

While incarcerated, individuals shall be given responsibilities and decision-making opportunities. Every opportunity shall be made to utilize the talents of those who are incarcerated. Those opportunities may be in the form of facility operation and maintenance, tutoring one another, or providing public services. Where it is possible for an individual to gain certification in an area of expertise that shall be encouraged. Those who are incarcerated shall receive adequate compensation for the work they perform. Persons shall be paid a minimum wage with a portion going to fines, fees, child support, victim restitution, and savings for use upon release. To the degree possible, community service programs shall be available for interested persons.

The United State shall ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture (OPCAT), and shall set up a mechanism that will operate to prevent abuse and torture in the country’s confinement facilities.

No person who is incarcerated shall have administrative, disciplinary, or supervisory power over others who are incarcerated.

There shall be no involuntary interstate transfers.

Housing shall be by consent.

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